Psoriatic Arthritis

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This page has been written for people affected by psoriatic arthritis. It provides general information to help you understand how you may be affected. It also covers what you can do to manage psoriatic arthritis and where to go for further information.

What is psoriatic arthritis?

Psoriatic arthritis is a condition that causes inflammation of the joints. This causes the joints to become painful, stiff and often swollen. Usually only people who have a skin disease called psoriasis are affected by psoriatic arthritis. Only one or two out of every 10 people with psoriasis will develop this type of arthritis.

What are the symptoms?

Psoriatic arthritis can affect any joint in the body and symptoms can vary from person to person. It can develop slowly with mild symptoms, or come on quickly and be severe. The most common symptoms are:

  • pain, swelling and stiffness in one or more joints
  • pain and stiffness in the buttocks, lower back or neck (also known as spondylitis, meaning inflammation of the spine)
  • pain in tendons, such as at the back of the heel or sole of the foot (tendons are the strong cords that attach muscles onto bones)
  • changes in nails, such as thickening, colour change or separation from the skin
  • pain and redness in the eyes.

What causes it?

The exact cause of psoriatic arthritis is not known. Genetics, the immune system and environmental factors, such as an infection, may play roles in causing this type of arthritis. This has yet to be proven in research. A certain gene called HLA-B27 is associated with psoriatic arthritis, especially inflammation of the spine. However this is a perfectly normal gene and there are many more people who have this gene and do not get psoriatic arthritis.

How is it diagnosed?

Your doctor will diagnose psoriatic arthritis from your symptoms and a physical examination. Your skin will be examined for signs of psoriasis, if you have not been diagnosed with this already. There is no specific test for psoriatic arthritis. However your doctor may order blood tests for inflammation, such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test. Blood tests may also help to rule out other types of arthritis. If your doctor suspects you have psoriatic arthritis you should be referred to a rheumatologist, a doctor who specialises in arthritis.

What will happen to me?

With the right treatment, most people with psoriatic arthritis can lead full and active lives. However the course of psoriatic arthritis is variable and no two cases are the same. Many people find their symptoms worsen at times (known as a 'flare') and then settle down for a period of time. About one in 20 people with psoriatic arthritis will develop a more severe, destructive form which can cause deformity to the joints in the hands and/or feet. Most people with psoriatic arthritis will need some ongoing treatment to control their symptoms and prevent damage to the joints. This is usually managed by a rheumatologist.

Psoriatic Arthritis continued…

Page created on 06 March 2012 - Content updated on 13 December 2012